Parlington Hall

Parlington Hall History

You are viewing the mobile version of the Parlington Hall history website. The project was started in 2003 to set out the history of the long lost old Yorkshire Mansion house, and in the intervening years it has grown to be a massive undertaking, amounting to over 1,900 pages. [As of the end of 2011]

Recently more visitors are venturing onto the site using mobile devices, therefore I have decided to add some of the newer sections and to provide summaries of each new article added, in a form which can be easily read on a mobile device.

There are many gaps in the story of this old hall and during it's long existance, many, many things have happened here that we shall never learn of, but slowly and surely we are uncovering some of the mysteries surrounding this historic place. For example, the discovery some years ago [2005] of the cellar beneath where the Small Drawing Room used to be.

More:

The Lost Cellar

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Cellar Excavations

Introduction

The site of the lost hall is today occupied by a small fraction of what once covered the ground. All that remains is a piece of the old West Wing, which was mostly guest and servant accommodation on the first floor, and the ground floor having working rooms, such as the Still Room, China Closet, Stores and Scullery, to name but a few.

The grounds around the present house are largely turfed and overlay the footprint of the old hall. Therefore even a trivial amount of garden digging can be interrupted by some piece of the former mansion! Thus the discovery of an old wall, occasioned by my foot becoming lodged down a rabbit burrow, left by some of the very many furry pests that abound on the estate.

The Dig!

Following the accidental uncovering of a small section of brickwall literally an inch or so beneath the turf; intrigued at what lay beneath, digging began! Following the direction of the old wall, running roughly north - south and on the west side. At about five feet deep, and a few days later, having excavated a hole approximately six feet wide by eight feet long, in the fairly loose demolition material, left behind from the early part of the twentieth century. I was still still enthusiastic, but my body less so, pressing on at the south end, the beginnings of a second wall started to be uncovered. After a course or so of brickwork, a curved section of bricks on edge, were clearly an arch! Excitedly I dug into the fill beneath the archway opening a hole sufficiently large to get through into the void . . . I slid down a short slope and found myself in a cellar.

View from inside the cellar up the entrance passage.

I was standing in a large basement perhaps 24 by about 12 feet wide, the limestone walls and vaulted ceiling clearly showed the chisel indentations from the mason, as he had cut and dressed the stone, perhaps many hundreds of years before. A few short strands of vegetation hung limply from some of the joints in the arch, beneath, in the natural stone that formed the floor were shallow indentations by dripping water seeping through the ceiling.

At the far end of the basement was a square drain, it's lip was above the surface of the floor. Fortunately the long summer had been dry and there was no trace of water, only watermarks at the foot of the stone walls.
The full article is available here on the main site

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Kennedy's Treatise

The Gardens House, and John Kennedy, the house was constructed for Sir Thomas Gascoigne to provide a base for his kitchen garden, surrounded by a hollow double skin brick wall, which was used to heat certain areas, notably the long greenhouses which faced roughly south on the walls on each side of the property and also along the inside of the northern face of the boundary garden wall.

I believe the house was built to look like one property, but in fact was divided into two, although not equally. The first occupant was probably John Kennedy who was gardner to Sir Thomas. He is remembered for a heavyweight tome he produced titled A Treatise upon Planting, Gardening, and the Management of the Hot-House, held in the Bodleian Library, since 1934.

A Treatise Upon Planting, Gardening, and the Management of the Hot-House

Containing

PREFACE
The many publications on Gardening and Planting, which have been offered of late years to the public, might have discouraged the Author of this Treatise from the present attempt; but as most of those that have fallen in his way, treat the subject in too general and speculative a method to be of service to practitioners, his intention in the following sheets is not to deliver himself systematically, but, in the most explicit manner, to lay before the public facts that have been successfully reduced to practice by himself.
Each particular subject he means to treat of, he will give the most minute directions as to the method of culture, labour, and management; together with the seasons that each particular work is to be performed in.
The planting of poor wastes, moorlands, and apparent barren mountains, has been but-seldom treated of and in very few places attempted.
The success the Author has had in planting such grounds, even in the north of Scotland, has induced him to treat that subject rather largely; and he flatters himself that, if his directions are followed, extensive tracts of land which are now useless may become ornamental and profitable.
A general system of gardening not being the intention of this treats, the Author will confine himself to the management of Vines, Ananas, Asparagus, and a new method of raising Mushrooms without spawn.
The directions given on those heads being very different from the general practice, may perhaps make some rather diffident in following them; but the Author avers that they are what he has followed with the greatest success for many years.
Agriculture being now the object of so general attention, the Author has added to this treatise the cultivation of Field-Cabbages and Carrots, induced thereto by the great crops he has himself raised, and there great advantage they are in feeding of horses, cattle, &c.
The instructions given in this treatise upon planting, Gardening, and rural economy, are the result of many years experience; should they meet with the approbation of the public, the Author will consider himself as well rewarded.
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